With so many looking to explore the countryside at all times of the year, some may be curious to learn more about Scotland's so-called 'right to roam'.

Since 2003, Scots have enjoyed differing rights to those in England when it comes to traversing and camping on land.

With so many rules around this 'right', here is everything you need to know.

What is the 'right to roam' in Scotland?

Helensburgh Advertiser: The right to roam in Scotland is set out in the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003 (Getty)The right to roam in Scotland is set out in the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003 (Getty) (Image: Getty)

According to legal firm Lindsays, the 'right to roam' is set out in Section 1 of the Land Reform (Scotland) Act 2003 and states that everyone in Scotland has the right to be on land for recreational purposes and to cross this land for said uses.

However, it is stressed that this right comes with a number of limitations and restrictions.

What are the exceptions around the 'right to roam' in Scotland?

The firm adds that the 'right to roam' must be exercised with responsibility with guidance being provided in the expertly crafted Scottish Outdoors Access Code.

The law also sets out boundaries for the use of private land with the 'right to roam' not extending to land that is adjacent to dwelling houses, farm buildings, compounds, schools and other similar features.

Helensburgh Advertiser: The right to roam does not apply to land adjacent to dwellings and other such features (Getty)The right to roam does not apply to land adjacent to dwellings and other such features (Getty) (Image: Getty)

How does the Scottish 'right to roam' differ from the law in England?

The law in England is rather different to that set out in Scotland with the 'right to roam' only applying to 'open access land', according to the UK Government website.

However, even in these areas, a person cannot simply camp, cycle, drive or horse ride.

This means that camping is restricted to campsites whereas in Scotland wild camping is possible and occurs regularly.

Does the right to roam apply to driving? 

No, motorised activities like off-road driving do not fall under the 'right to roam' and require the landowner's permission.